Doctor of Education in International Higher Education concentration

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Overview

We have suspended new enrollments to the Doctor of Education (EdD), International Higher Education concentration and are no longer accepting applications for admission.

If you are a student currently enrolled in this concentration, our advising staff will work with you to complete all coursework by July 1, 2013.

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The Doctor of Education (EdD), International Higher Education concentration builds on Northeastern University’s commitment to practitioner-oriented graduate programs. Indeed, the goal of the EdD is to instill in educators and administrators the desire and ability to effect transformational change in their practice.

To achieve this goal, EdD students learn within the social constructs of their courses and through communities of practice based on shared professional experiences and common interests. They engage in a collaborative, scholarly investigation of a significant problem facing educators and formulate their own solution to that problem. This engagement helps them enfold the roles of learner, researcher, and practitioner, and fosters their self-identities as scholar practitioners.

International Higher Education Concentration

Tailored to meet the needs of global higher education professionals who want a broader and deeper understanding of their field, the EdD with a concentration in International Higher Education is particularly relevant for mid-level administrators seeking career advancement. Program objectives include:

  • Study entrepreneurship and innovation from the higher education perspective through case studies examining the reasons for entrepreneurial successes and failures
  • Explore financial aspects of postsecondary educational institutions with particular emphasis on the use of financial information for decision making
  • Investigate current and emerging trends resulting from changing global demographic and economic shifts, as well as varied reform initiatives
  • Examine the many types of collaborations and partnerships available to institutions and explore the factors that influence success
  • Review higher education issues of quality, assessment, outcomes, faculty development, use of adjunct faculty, etc., which are intensified in transnational delivery

Curriculum

 

Required Foundation Courses (21 q.h.)

Complete all of the following courses:

EDU 7200 Social and Cultural Analysis of Education Systems 3 q.h.
EDU 7202 Transforming Educational Systems 3 q.h.
EDU 7203 Ethical Decision Making for Education Leaders 3 q.h.
EDU 7205 Research Processes Based in Practice  3 q.h.
EDU 7208 Theoretical Foundations of Education Research and Practice 3 q.h.
EDU 7215 Understanding Qualitative and Quantitative Research Data 3 q.h.


Choose one of the following courses:

EDU 7201 Global and Historical Perspectives of Education 3 q.h.
EDU 7204 Global and Historical Perspectives on Higher Education 3 q.h.


International Higher Education Concentration Courses (12 q.h.)

Choose four of the following courses:

EDU 7255 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Higher Education  3 q.h.
EDU 7256 Financial Decision Making in Higher Education  3 q.h.
EDU 7260 Comparative International/Global Higher Education  3 q.h.
EDU 7262 Collaborations and Partnerships  3 q.h.
EDU 7264 Educating Global Students: Issues and Practices  3 q.h.


Elective Courses (6 q.h.)

Students may opt to take one additional course from the International Higher Education Concentration (above) and one course from any of the following concentrations, or two courses from any of the following concentrations:

Curriculum Leadership Concentration

EDU 7230 Current and Emerging Practice in STEM Education 3 q.h.
EDU 7231 National and International Benchmarks in STEM Education 3 q.h.
EDU 7232 Linking Theory and Practice Through Partnerships 3 q.h.
EDU 7233 Knowledge and Critical Skill Integration  3 q.h.
EDU 7240 Curriculum Design and Dissemination 3 q.h.
EDU 7241 International Research and Practices in Curricula 3 q.h.
EDU 7242 Situated Curriculum Leadership 3 q.h.
EDU 7243 Doctoral Research in Curriculum Leadership 3 q.h.


Educational Leadership K-12 Concentration

EDU 7220  Creating High-Performance Teams 3 q.h.
EDU 7221 Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration 3 q.h.
EDU 7222 Community Engagement 3 q.h.
EDU 7223 Communication Challenges for Education Leaders 3 q.h.
EDU 7211 Public and Institutional Policy 3 q.h.
EDU 7212 Financial Decision Making for Education Leaders 3 q.h.
EDU 7213 Education Entrepreneurship 3 q.h.
EDU 7217 Educational Systems: The Dynamics between Policy, Values, and Practice 3 q.h.


Higher Education Administration Concentration

EDU 7250 Organizational Systems and Institutional Governance 3 q.h.
EDU 7251 Enrollment Management, Students, and Markets 3 q.h.
EDU 7252 Fundraising, Alumni, and Development  3 q.h.
EDU 7253 The Legal Environment of Higher Education 3 q.h.
EDU 7254 Postsecondary and Institutional Public Policy 3 q.h.
EDU 7255 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Higher Education 3 q.h.
EDU 7256 Financial Decision Making in Higher Education 3 q.h.
EDU 7257 The Urban University in the United States 3 q.h.


Jewish Education Leadership Concentration

JLS 6220 Curriculum Development in Jewish Education  3 q.h.
JLS 6230 Philosophies of Jewish Education  3 q.h.
JLS 6240 Assessment in Jewish Education  3 q.h.
JLS 6250 Critical Issues in Jewish Education Leadership: Case Studies  3 q.h.
JLS 6260 Leadership Challenges in Jewish Education  3 q.h.
JLS 6270 Landscape of Jewish Education in North America 3 q.h.


Organizational Leadership and Communication Concentration

EDU 7270 Leadership and Communication: Challenges and Interdependencies 3 q.h.
EDU 7271 Information and Communication: Social and Conventional Networks 3 q.h.
EDU 7272 Embedding Culture through Communication 3 q.h.
EDU 7273 Professional Leadership and Communication 3 q.h.
EDU 7274 Doctoral Seminar in Organizational Leadership and Communication 3 q.h.
EDU 7275 Contemporary Models of Leadership 3 q.h.
EDU 7276 Organizational Communication: Institutional and Global Perspectives 3 q.h.
EDU 7277 Organizational Learning and Systems Thinking 3 q.h.


Doctoral Thesis Courses (6 q.h.)

 EDU 8790 Doctoral Thesis Seminar  6 q.h.
 EDU 8791 Doctoral Thesis Continuation**  0 q.h.

**Students may continue to work on their doctoral theses provided they enroll in the EDU 8791 Doctoral Thesis Continuation for each term beyond the seminar. There is a continuation fee associated with this course but no academic credit.


Total Quarter Hours: 45


Tuition

Estimated total tuition for this program is $0.00.

Tuition for individual courses is based on the number of quarter hours. Most courses are 3-6 quarter hours. See Graduate Tuition Rates for details.

Use our Tuition Calculator below to see if transfer credit or tuition reimbursement from your employer could reduce your total tuition.

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Please note: The estimated total tuition is based on tuition rates for Academic Year 2016-17 and does not include any fees or other expenses. Some courses and labs have tuition rates that may increase or decrease total tuition. Tuition and fees are subject to revision by the president and Board of Trustees at any time.

*A maximum of 9 quarter hours of graduate- or doctoral-level credit obtained at another institution may be awarded as Advanced Graduate Credit to the Doctor of Education program.


FAQs

General Questions

What is the difference between a PhD and an EdD? The EdD is a terminal degree recognized by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as equivalent to the PhD It prepares students to become scholar-practitioners. The distinction between the two degrees is that the PhD can be grounded in original or theoretical research, whereas the EdD places an emphasis on educational research tied to practice. The first EdD degree was granted at Harvard University in 1920. It was awarded in response to an expressed need for more practitioners with doctoral training.

Is the EdD accredited? There are six regional accrediting bodies. The accrediting body that awards Northeastern University’s accreditation is NEASC (New England Association of Schools and Colleges). Regional is the highest level of accreditation awarded to any university.

Does the EdD lead to state certification? No, there is no specific certification associated with the EdD at this time.

How many quarter hours are required for the EdD? The EdD is comprised of 45 quarter hours. Students are encouraged to take two courses each term.

What is the availability of the main campus library? A wealth of library resources, including journals and research databases, are available online. Visiting the main campus library in person is always an option. Students can confer with research librarians via phone, email, and online chat.

 

Admissions Questions

Does the College of Professional Studies accept transfer credits into the EdD? The College of Professional Studies does not accept transfer credits at the doctoral level. All students must complete 45 quarter hours in the EdD program.

 

Course Questions

What is the delivery format for courses? All EdD courses run on the College of Professional Studies quarter term academic calendar: 12-week terms start in September, January, and April. Hybrid courses use a mixture of face-to-face and online instruction; other courses are completely online. There are also summer residency courses, which are full 3.0-quarter-hour courses in a special hybrid format. Summer residency courses begin online at the start of the summer term and meet for one week of face-to-face instruction on the Boston campus, with the remainder of the course online. Each course taken in this summer residency* format fulfills one residency requirement for the program.

*In addition to the summer residency special hybrid courses, any course in a standard hybrid format that meets on the Boston Campus during any term of the year fulfills a residency requirement. Standard format Boston hybrids are a blend of online instruction and on-ground classes that meet weeknights every other week during a term.

When and where do classes meet? Hybrid courses are offered at Northeastern University’s Boston campus. Most on-campus courses meet on Saturdays. The summer residency courses meet in Boston.

What is the doctoral thesis? The doctoral thesis represents a rigorous and scholarly approach to investigating a problem of educational practice. Students first identify the problem to be addressed in their thesis before they undertake a rigorous process of inquiry and reflection about the origins, significance, and nature of the problem, as well as alternative ways to address it in practice.

When do I start focusing on the doctoral thesis? The doctoral thesis is the sole focus of student activity after completing the final research course. However, preparation for the thesis begins in the first term and with the first set of courses. The content and delivery of every course has been tailored to help meet the knowledge and skill requirements of the doctoral theses.

Do committees review doctoral thesis proposals and the thesis themselves? Yes, there are thesis review committees who will hear candidates’ proposal presentations and review final doctoral thesis defenses. All doctoral thesis defenses take place on the Boston campus.

What support is offered for students completing their theses? Each student is assigned a faculty research advisor within their Scholar Practitioner Community (SPC) group after successful completion of the second research course, Theoretical Foundations of Research and Practice. SPC groups are formed based on shared research interests or other logical groupings. This structure provides support and collaboration with peers and the SPC faculty advisor. EdD students work collaboratively, but ultimately produce and defend individual doctoral research theses.

What are the components of the doctoral thesis?

Doctoral Thesis Proposal (DTP):

  • A formal proposal that builds on and continues to refine the DPS, including a full literature review and a proposed research design
  • Presentation of the DTP in a public faculty/student forum is required, which may be online or on campus

Doctoral Thesis and Oral Defense:

  • The final product in the program that builds on and continues to refine the proposal, including research data and findings, and implications for other practitioners and the wider field
  • A successful oral defense of the doctoral thesis, before a faculty review committee, is required

Summer Residency Questions

What is the summer residency? The summer residency courses are full 3.0-quarter-hour courses in a special hybrid format. Summer residency courses begin online at the start of the summer term and meet for one week of face-to-face instruction on the Boston campus, with the remainder of the course online. Each course taken in this summer residency format fulfills one residency requirement of the EdD

Who should attend the summer residency courses? All students are encouraged to use the summer residency courses to satisfy their residency requirement. If you are unable to take hybrid courses during the summer, please contact your advisor upon being accepted into the program.

Are accommodations provided? Yes, campus-based housing is available at reduced rates for students registered in summer residency courses. Reservation information is available to current students through the Student Resource Center on Blackboard.


Doctoral Thesis

Doctoral Thesis

Doctoral theses provide students with an opportunity to apply their knowledge and insights, as well as their skills in analysis, synthesis, problem solving, and teamwork. The theme of each thesis is a significant curricular, policy, or management problem confronting public or higher education in the U.S. and/or other countries. Within those themes, students will identify more focused issues that have particular urgency to their state, region, district, or institution.

The doctoral thesis represents a rigorous and scholarly approach to investigating a problem of educational practice. Students first identify the problem to be addressed in their thesis before they undertake a rigorous process of inquiry and reflection about the origins, significance, and nature of the problem, as well as alternative ways to address it in practice.

Many doctoral theses culminate in the design, implementation, and evaluation of a research-based intervention. Examples include innovative approaches to teaching and learning among target student groups from pre-K through G16, organizational restructuring plans, new faculty development strategies, new leadership models for higher education administration, policy papers, and program assessments.

The doctoral thesis is the focus of student activity in their third year in the program. However, preparation for the thesis begins in the first term and with the first set of courses. The content and delivery of every course has been tailored to help meet the knowledge and skill requirements of the doctoral theses. Several foundational research courses play particularly key roles. The first two are Theoretical Foundations of Education Research and Practice and Research Processes Based in Practice. By the time students take the second of these courses, typically in the third or fourth term, they are expected to begin framing a draft of their preliminary proposal for their doctoral thesis and to identify other students with similar thesis interests.


Summer Residency

The summer residency offers doctoral students an intense and collaborative learning experience encompassed in a weeklong required format. In addition to participating in a summer course, students are engaged throughout the week in a series of stimulating presentations, seminars, workshops, and events. Some of the highlights of the summer residency include:

  • A renowned guest speaker from the field of education
  • Panel discussions comprised of established scholar-practitioners who dissect timely and critical issues in education
  • Exciting student-to-student and student-to-faculty networking activities
  • Special workshops that center on doctoral research skill building
  • Thought-provoking presentations that showcase current doctoral student research

Schedule

The 2012 residency will take place during the following weeks in:

  • Week One - July 22, 2012 to July 27, 2012
  • Week Two - July 29, 2012 to August 3, 2012.

Students travel to Boston and start their residency on Sunday. Below is a summary of the schedule:

Sunday Monday - Friday
  • Dean’s Welcome
  • Doctor of Education program investment discussion
  • Celebrated guest speaker presentation
  • Faculty and student research presentations
Class time is 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM daily. lasses will entail doctoral research skill development workshops, seminars, and panel discussions with prominent educational practitioners and researchers.

Each year the summer residency program grows and changes based on student feedback. This coming year, get ready for a week-long series of truly exciting and informative activities that will support and guide you as you achieve your doctorate in education.

Housing

On-campus housing is available in one of Northeastern's state-of-the-art complexes. We offer private, single bedrooms with semi-private baths. Features include:

  • Central air
  • Elevators
  • Laundry facilities
  • Vending areas
  • TV/Study lounges
  • 24/7 staffed proctor stations

Talk to an Enrollment Coach

We can walk you through your program options and the application process.

 

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